Ramen Rising

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Ramen Rising

Photo Credit/ Pixabay

Photo Credit/ Pixabay

Photo Credit/ Pixabay

Photo Credit/ Pixabay

Hannah Wavrek, Sports Editor

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When most people think of soup, they envision chicken noodle, tomato, or other Campbell’s classics.  However, in recent years, ramen has been becoming more and more mainstream.

Ramen had been considered the staple food of college students for some time.  Brands like Maruchan have dominated the industry with their instant ramen noodles. With a variety of flavors and prices of less than $3 for 12 packs, they are dominating the ramen noodle world.

Ramen is simply a type of noodle prepared in a specific way. They are the thin, slightly curly noodles prepared in broth with a meat, usually pork.  This soup has origins in China. In the nineteenth century, Chinese tradesmen arrived in Japan showing their creation, and quickly ramen became a staple of Asian cuisine.

While the traditional type of ramen is booming in Asia, the United States had been stuck on the cheap, instant ramen since its creation in the 1970s. Recently, however, consumers have been getting tired of the instant ramen.

The “real” ramen has been gaining popularity. The classic, more culturally accurate soup is now common among restaurants nationwide.

Here in Chicago, there are many amazing ramen restaurants. Ramen- San, for instance, is a strictly ramen restaurant in River North. They serve constructed dishes but also offer a make-your-own option with your choice of broth, noodle, seasoning, meat, and toppings.

As the more high-class approach to ramen has risen in popularity in the United States, the soup has become almost a completely different variety than that of the instant dorm room classic.

This change is definitely for the better and has shown how the popularity of one cheap item can spark change in the entire restaurant industry. Ramen is becoming classier and closer to its roots, and it is now eaten by a wider variety of people. My hope is that many other foods will follow and that we will have an even greater opportunity to eat cuisine from other cultures without much hassle.

 

 

 

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